Aboriginal Communities

At SHine SA we aim to:

  • strengthen partnerships and networks with Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) peoples, communities and organisations
  • provide culturally appropriate and accessible sexual health services
  • provide accredited education and training for ATSI workers in sexual health
  • provide professional support for ATSI workers
  • involve and support ATSI workers in education, prevention and promotion programs that build the capacity of the indigenous community
  • involve the ATSI community in the development, implementation and evaluation of SHine SA’s one-to-one service provision
  • develop culturally appropriate information and resources
  • partner and collaborate with other service providers who work with Aboriginal communities to promote a holistic approach to health

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Karrparrinthi, which means “Supporting Each Other” in the Kaurna language, is a new Aboriginal sexual health and wellbeing centre in Woodville. Established by SHine SA in collaboration with Aboriginal community members and other Aboriginal health service providers, this cottage-style facility provides a venue for sexual health clinics, drug and alcohol services and other health services either by appointment or as a drop-in service.

Karrparrinthi hosts fortnightly community education sessions featuring guest speakers, and SHine SA’s “Yarning On” Aboriginal sexual health program is based in this facility.

Karrparrinthi is located close to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital and is convenient for visitors from rural, regional and remote South Australia.

Contact Details

Open:       9:00am – 5:00pm Monday to Friday

Address:   51 Bower Street, Woodville, SA 5011

Phone:      1300 794 584

Fax:           (08) 8300 5399

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Upcoming Clinic Dates

Doctor:       Wednesday, 1 July

Nurse:         Wednesday, 1 July

Diabetes Information – Michael ‘The Sugerman’ Porter (Wednesday, 15 July)

Michael ‘The Sugerman’ Porter presents an information session about diabetes.

Mike Porter is a registered nurse and credentialed diabetes educator. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus at a young age and has been living with diabetes for most of his life. Mike is considered a leader in insulin pump therapy, commencement of insulin, prevention of diabetic complications and Indigenous health.

Mike has worked in both the public system, private practice and lectures in diabetes management, Indigenous health and the Australian health care system. He currently works for Roche Diagnostics Australia as their diabetes clinical specialist. Mike believes that the Indigenous traditional story telling technique is the perfect way to simplify complex conditions and plays an important part in today’s health care system.

Michael is best known for his Sugarman project, which he uses to educate rural communities about diabetes. He first presented the Sugarman at a hospital in South Australia and has since presented it at events around the country in order to tackle the serious problem of diabetes in the Indigenous community. Sugarman provides diabetes education to both adults and children in a fun and interactive way.

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Shine SA received funding through the National Indigenous Partnerships (Indigenous Early Childhood Development and Close the Gap on Indigenous and Reproductive Health) to develop and deliver Sexual Health Education Programs Targeting Aboriginal Young People, which aim to improve the sexual and reproductive health, wellbeing and safety of young Aboriginal South Australians.

Yarning On has two programs that have been developed: Aboriginal Focus School Program and Investing in Aboriginal Youth Program. Both programs address the high rates of: Teenage pregnancy, STI’s, Low birth weight babies and Domestic Violence. The programs do this by building the capacity of the community and workforce to develop culturally appropriate solutions to promote respectful relationships and improved sexual health literacy and therefore health and wellbeing outcomes for Aboriginal young people and their communities.

Both programs are complimentary, interact and based on consultation and have in place principles of best practice in program delivery, mandatory reporting education that reinforces the right every child has to be safe, curriculum, resources and community programs that address the communities’ issues and aspirations.

The Investing in Aboriginal Youth Program aims to work with:

  • health and education workers and community members
  • young Aboriginal people
  • communities

within identified rural, remote and metropolitan Aboriginal communities to promote and improve the relationship and sexual health literacy of young Aboriginal people.

It will achieve this, through:

  • training and support of health , community workers and community members to engage young people aged 12–24 years out of the school system using a peer education and youth participation model
  • development of culturally appropriate resources
  • engagement of parents in appropriate programs

The Aboriginal Focus Schools Program, based on the best practice Focus Schools Program, aims to increase the capacity of principals, teachers, Anangu Education Workers, Aboriginal Community Education Officers, parents and school communities in the targeted schools to promote and improve the relationship and sexual health literacy and wellbeing of school students in Years 5,6 & 7 and Years 8, 9 & 10.

It will achieve this through:

  • development of age and culturally appropriate curriculum
  • training and support for teachers, Anangu Education Workers and Aboriginal Community Education Officers
  • development of culturally appropriate resources
  • parent programs

The Aboriginal Focus Schools Program was developed as part of the Yarning On program specifically for use in Anangu and Aboriginal schools and schools that have high numbers of Aboriginal students. The program ensures Anangu and Aboriginal students have the same opportunity to access culturally appropriate comprehensive relationships and sexual health education as students in other metropolitan and rural schools. The program aims to improve the relationships, sexual health, safety and wellbeing of young Aboriginal South Australians by supporting schools to develop a whole school approach to relationships and sexual health education.

Anangu Education Workers (AEW’s), Aboriginal Community Education Officers (ACEO’s), key community members and parents or caregivers are a vital part of the program which provides lessons at Years 5 through 10 using a ‘building block’ approach. Anangu and Aboriginal worker involvement in the delivery of the program is crucial to ensure cultural respect, appropriateness and learning. This partner approach has benefits for students, community and teaching staff.

Yarning On initiative: Stage One Final Evaluation Report

SHine SA produces a range of resources including leaflets, booklets, fact sheets, manuals and posters. To view and order these resources see the SHine SA resources section.

A range of books and DVDs on sexual health and relationships for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people is available from the SHine SA Library.

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